Fierce Excerpts: The power of listening.

brandfiercely1Communication, Fierce Excerpts

*Image: Lucille Manley, my grandmother, was one of the the best listeners I have ever met. She always made you feel like you were the only person in the room. Now Reading | The Simple Secret to Making an Instant Connection with Everyone. (Entrepreneur)  Here’s a little trivia. Did you know that we listen at 125-250 words per minute, but that we think at 1,000 to 3,000 words per minute? Fascinating. And did you know that “listen” and “silent” have the exact same letters? I did not realize that but I think that is pretty cool. Being a good listener is a critical skill for us in the advertising … Read More

When online collaboration is better than face-to-face.

brandfiercely1Creative Process, Digital

Considering the current state of FS+C, the title of this Harvard Business Review article immediately caught my attention: Online Collaboration is Sometimes Better Than Face-to-Face. If you visit here often, you know I am strong supporter of the world-wide office. Currently Fierce is based in the US and Canada with creative talent from Japan to California. Online collaboration is an issue we face everyday and we are always looking for ways to do it smarter and more efficiently. As much as I am also a strong proponent for face-to-face time, I loved all the reasons HBR gave for why online collaboration is sometimes better. Online collaboration, like … Read More

Fierce Excerpts: Just the facts.

brandfiercely1Communication, Fierce Excerpts

Now Reading | 5 Habits of Truly Amazing Communicators. https://www.themuse.com/advice/5-habits-of-truly-amazing-communicators?utm_content=buffere2c1c&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer This was a great little article and a quick read. Some great reminders on how to be a good communicator. 1. Stop saying “But” and start saying “And” As soon as you say the word “but,” the other person immediately forgets the part about you loving the idea. Because you completely invalidated it with the “but” and everything that came after it. Instead, use “and:” “I love that idea, and I think a slightly different approach would be most effective.” In her book Bossypants, Tina Fey breaks down the rules of improv. One of those rules is … Read More